Friday, April 25, 2014

Ayumi Goto and Peter Morin Performances and Installation

Re-posted from the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre. 
As part of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre’s ongoing critical and creative Healing and Reconciliation through Education programming, the SRSC is pleased to announce new, original performances and installations by visiting artists Peter Morin and Ayumi Goto.

Peter Morin is a 2014 Sobey Award-nominated Tahltan Nation artist, curator and writer. He will present an original performance called escape stories Friday, April 25 at the Art Gallery of Algoma at 3 pm in collaboration with Ayumi Goto. This performance is, in part, related to Morin’s 2012 visit to Algoma University and the site of the former Shingwauk Indian Residential School, as well as his participation in the SRSC-sponsored artist residency Reconsidering Reconciliation held at Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, Scewepemc Territory, in August 2013. He recently returned from London, UK, and a series of performances exploring the kidnapping of an Inuk baby and his mother from the land in 1547, which forms the foundation for escape stories. The performance will take place within the Education Gallery at the AGA, which currently houses Why the Caged Bird Sings: Here I Am by Cheryl L’Hirondelle, who similarly participated in visiting artist and residency events put on by the SRSC.

Ayumi Goto is a performance artist based in Kelowna, Okanagan Nation territory. Born in Canada, she draws upon her Japanese heritage to trouble sedimented notions of nation-building, cultural belonging, and structural racism in her creative work. Like Morin and L’Hirondelle, Goto has been engaged with the SRSC and other partners in explorations of the role of art and artist in healing and reconciliation. Over a course of 105 days in 2013, Goto ran 1568.5 km around communities in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Ontario to recognize and pay homage to the Journey of Nishiyuu, in which six young Cree men led by guide Isaac Kawapit, walked from Whapmagoostui, Northern Quebec to Ottawa to raise awareness of Aboriginal issues. She reinforced the walkers’ laborious efforts to bring attention to the Idle No More movement, as well as attempting to transform her own relationship to the land. Her installation at the SRSC, which will open Saturday, April 26 at 7 pm explores this experience through the daily poetic and visual responses she created.

Both Morin’s performance at the AGA and Goto’s installation at the SRSC are open to the public and free for all to attend. Refreshments will be served and the artists will be available for conversations after each event.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Ontario Open Data

The Province of Ontario has announced that it in the process of making government data open by default.  This is part of Ontario's larger Open Government initiative that focuses on open data, open engagement, and open government more generally.  

Since November 2012 the Ontario government has been publishing statistics in the open data catalogue.  So far 170 data sets have been placed online.  This includes statistics on marriage registrations, farmers markers, water wells, flu shot clinics, woodland caribou and a wide range of other interesting topics.  The data already online is a huge boon to researchers and is available in a variety of formats depending on the type of data and the original collection method. 

In addition to the open data calalogue Ontario has created a data inventory.  Which describes more than 1,000 data sets.  The inventory is designed to allow the public to vote on which data sets are the most popular as a means of prioritizing the order in which data sets are made accessible. 

Friday, April 4, 2014

Slow Art Day

April 12th 2014 is Slow Art Day.  A day dedicated to encouraging people to discover art and the joy of looking at art.  The day also emphasizes the idea that people can see and experience art without an expert. 

Art galleries and museums internationally are hosting Slow Art Day events.  Most events are structured to allow participants to look at art slowly, by having people look at five works of art for ten minutes each.  Participants then discuss their experience of looking at art. The simple structure makes it easy for galleries to participate.

Started in 2009 with 16 museums and galleries in North America and Europe Slow Art Day has expended to have over 210 venues on every continent in 2014. The list of this year's participating venues can be seen here

Locally, the Art Gallery of Algoma will be participating in Slow Art Day with art viewing from 12:00-1:00pm and Slow Food Lunch in the Cafe from 1:00-2:00pm.